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   ► KBProgrammingVB.NetTool Basics   Print This     

VB.Net KB: Tool Basics Topic



13 Articles Found in the Tool Basics Topic 

  KB Article    

Mike Prestwood
1. A 10 Minute VB.Net Console Application Quick Start

This will show how to make a "hello world" console application in Visual Studio 2008 using VB.Net.

11 years ago, and updated 8 years ago
(5 Comments , last by Greater.H )

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Wes Peterson
2. Telerik Extensions for ASP.NET MVC - Free http://www.telerik.com/products/aspnet-mvc.aspx?utm_source=CodeProjectNewsletter&utm_medium=banner&utm_campaign=MVC_Jan15
9 years ago

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Mike Prestwood
3. VB.Net Assignment (=)

Languages Focus: Assignment

Common assignment operators for languages include =, ==, and :=. An assignment operator allows you to assign a value to a variable. The value can be a literal value like "Mike" or 42 or the value stored in another variable or returned by a function.

VB.Net Assignment

VB.Net uses = for it's assignment operator.

11 years ago, and updated 11 years ago

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Mike Prestwood
4. VB.Net Comments (' or REM)

Languages Focus: Comments

Commenting code generally has three purposes: to document your code, for psuedo coding prior to coding, and to embed compiler directives. Most languages support both a single line comment and a multiple line comment. Some languages also use comments to give instructions to the compiler or interpreter.

VB.Net Comments

Commenting Code
VB.Net, like all the VB-based languages, uses a single quote (') or the original class-style basic "REM" (most developers just use a quote). VB.Net does NOT have a multiple line comment.

11 years ago, and updated 10 years ago
(6 Comments , last by funny.j )

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Mike Prestwood
5. VB.Net Constants (Const kPI Double = 3.1459)

In VB.Net, you define constants with the Const keyword.

All constants are part of a class (no global constants) but you can make a constant public and have access to it using ClassName.ConstantName so long as you have added the class to the project. This works even without creating the class as if the public constants were static, but you cannot use the Shared keyword.

Constants must be of an integral type (sbyte, byte, short, ushort, int, uint, long, ulong, char, float, double, decimal, bool, or string), an enumeration, or a reference to null.

11 years ago, and updated 10 years ago

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Mike Prestwood
6. VB.Net Deployment Overview

VB.Net projects require the .Net framework and any additional dependencies you've added such as Crystal Reports.

In Visual Studio.Net, you can create a Setup and Deployment project by using any of the templates available on the New Project dialog (Other Project Types).

In addition, VB.Net projects also support ClickOnce which brings the ease of Web deployment to Windows Forms and console applications. To get started, right click on your solution in the Solution Explorer, click Properties then select the Security tab. 

In addition, you can use any of the many free and commercially available installation packages.

10 years ago
(1 Comments , last by Anonymous )

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Mike Prestwood
7. VB.Net Development Tools

Languages Focus: Development Tools

Primary development tool(s) used to develop and debug code.

VB.Net Development Tools

Microsoft Visual Basic Express Editions (as in Visual Basic 2008 Express Edition) and the full version of Microsoft Visual Studio.Net are the current primary tools. VB.Net is not compatible with VB Classic.

11 years ago, and updated 10 years ago

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Mike Prestwood
8. VB.Net End of Statement (Return)

Languages Focus: End of Statement

In coding languages, common End of statement specifiers include a semicolon and return (others exist too). Also of concern when studying a language is can you put two statements on a single code line and can you break a single statement into two or more code lines.

VB.Net End of Statement

A return marks the end of a statement and you cannot combine statements on a single line of code. You can break a single statement into two or more code lines by using a space and underscore " _".

11 years ago, and updated 10 years ago

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Mike Prestwood
9. VB.Net Literals (quote)

General Info: Programming Literals

A value directly written into the source code of a computer program (as opposed to an identifier like a variable or constant). Literals cannot be changed. Common types of literals include string literals, floating point literals, integer literals, and hexidemal literals. Literal strings are usually either quoted (") or use an apostrophe (') which is often referred to as a single quote. Sometimes quotes are inaccurately referred to as double quotes.

Languages Focus: Literals

In addition to understanding whether to use a quote or apostrophe for string literals, you also want to know how to specify and work with other types of literals including floating point literals. Some compilers allow leading and trailing decimals (.1 + .1), while some require a leading or trailing 0 as in (0.1 + 0.1). Also, because floating point literals are difficult for compilers to represent accurately, you need to understand how the compiler handles them and how to use rounding and trimming commands correctly for the nature of the project your are coding.

VB.Net Literals

String literals are quoted as in "Prestwood". If you need to embed a quote use two quotes in a row.

To specify a floating point literal between 1 and -1, preceed the decimal with a 0. If you don't, the compiler will auto-correct your code and place a leading 0. It will change .1 to 0.1 automatically. Trailing decimals are not allowed.

11 years ago, and updated 10 years ago
(1 Comments , last by Patricia.F )

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Mike Prestwood
10. VB.Net Overview and History

Language Overview: VB.Net is an OOP language (no global functions or variables). You code using a fully OOP approach (everything is in a class).

Target Platforms: VB.Net is most suitable for creating any type of application that runs on the .Net platform. This includes desktop business applications using WinForms and websites using WebForms.

11 years ago, and updated 10 years ago

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Mike Prestwood
11. VB.Net Report Tools Overview

Microsoft includes ReportViewer Starting with Visual Studio 2005. You can even surface this .Net solution in your VB Classic application if you wish. For WebForm applications the client target is the browser (a document interfaced GUI), a common solution is to simply output an HTML formatted page with black text and a white background (not much control but it does work for some situations). For WinForm applications, Crystal Reports is still very popular with VB.Net developers because it has been bundled with Visual Basic since VB 3, it's overall popularity, and compatibility with many different development tools.

11 years ago, and updated 11 years ago

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Mike Prestwood
12. VB.Net String Concatenation (+ or &)

Most (many?) developers recommend using "+" because that's what C# uses but "&" is also available and many VB Classic and VBA/ASP developers prefer it. My preference is to use the & because it offers implicit type casting.

11 years ago, and updated 10 years ago

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Mike Prestwood
13. VB.Net Variables (Dim x As Integer=0)

Variables are case sensitive but VS.Net will auto-fix your variable names to the defined case. You can declare variables in-line wherever you need them and declarative variable assignment is supported.

11 years ago, and updated 10 years ago
(2 Comments , last by Darius.B )

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