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Proj Man Flashcards Library

These FlashCards are contributed by you (our online community members). They are organized by our knowledge base topics. Specifically, by the Proj Man sub-topics.

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22 PM, Process, and PSDP FlashCards

Group: PM, Process, and PSDP


Topic: PSDP & Process

Tip: Have Client Sign Requirements
When youre finishing an application for a client, nothing is more frustrating than the client telling you that the application is all wrong. Do yourself a favor: During or shortly after the planning stage, be sure to echo to the client what you heard him or her say. Also consider putting your general plan in writing and have both you and your client sign it. This approach makes you a more professional consultant.
Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100592, KB Topic: PSDP & Process
Definition

PSDP Items

Definition: A task, requirement item, design item, test script, or defect. Generically you could refer to items in PSDP as software artifacts (especially requirement items, design items, and test scripts). A PSDP Artifact is a feature that links to together a task, requirement item, design item, and test script.
Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100936, KB Topic: PSDP & Process
Definition

Waterfall Process

Definition: With the waterfall approach to developing software, one phase of the development cycle follows the other and the user is involved only at the beginning during the requirements gathering phase and at the end during the acceptance phase. The requirements gathering in the waterfall approach is critical and unless it is 100 percent perfect, the project will fall short. Other processes, including PSDP, involve the end user throughout the process ensuring a better outcome.
Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100614, KB Topic: PSDP & Process



Topic: PSDP Analysis

Definition

Actor (PSDP Online)

Definition: In PSDP Online, an actor is a UML Actor, role, or person that interfaces with the system you are building. When establishing actors of your system, do not think in terms of a specific person, think in terms of their role. Do not name an actor the name of the person filling the role. If Bob is our Sales Clerk, name your actor Sales Clerk (not Bob).
Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100943, KB Topic: PSDP Analysis
Definition

PSDP Requirement Item

Definition:

A software artifact that documents what the software must do. In PSDP, we collect general requirements and requirement items. Together the general requirements and requirement items make up the Requirements Specification.

Also, requrement items are one of the four items that make up a PSDP Artifact.

Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100937, KB Topic: PSDP Analysis



Topic: PSDP Artifacts

Tip: Apply PSDP Artifacts to Existing Applications
You can apply PSDP Artifacts to an existing system that has ongoing development and/or maintenance. For desktop applications, start with one PSDP Artifact per form and report. For websites, start with one PSDP Artifact per page. If you have a utility that imports and/or exports data, start with one PSDP Artifact per import/outport combination. Perhaps add each artifact as you go forward in your development.
Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100951, KB Topic: PSDP Artifacts
Tip: Artifact Assignment
If you are a single developer, assign the artifact to that single developer and use it to track the completion of both the documentation of the artifact (requirement, design, and test script) as well as the building and testing of it. If you are part of a development team, assign the artifact to the resource gathering requirements and create additional tasks.
Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100946, KB Topic: PSDP Artifacts
Q&A: Artifacts or Not
Question: I'm starting a new project, should I use PSDP Artifacts or just collect individual items?

Answer:

The problem with collecting individual items is that the user inputting the item tends to put to much information in tasks and use requirement items and design items only as a secondary thought. When collecting project information, you generally collect a combination of what the customer wants (the requirement), how you want to code it (the design), how to test it (the test script), and even a bit of end-user documentation. Your tendency will be to put all of it in whatever bucket your looking at. A PSDP Artifact puts you on a single page where you can put information into their correct place, their correct bucket.

By using primarily Artifacts, you put yourself in the correct frame of mind while developing that feature from the first time you talk about it through testing it, and artifacts make managing linked items easier (one location to deal with name, category, linked actors, etc.)

Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100941, KB Topic: PSDP Artifacts
Q&A: Defining PSDP Artifacts
Question: I'm struggling with what to define as a PSDP Artifact. I'm worried I'll get too detailed or too general. What is the scope of a typical PSDP Artifact? Is there a rule of thumb?

Answer:

There is no right or wrong way to define the scope of a PSDP Artifact. More artifacts leads to a heavier process, less to a lighter. A good rule of thumb is to create them based on intended deliverables or on the content of the requirements.

For deliverables based, you can start with one PSDP Artifact per form and report and/or per table in the database skipping minor items. For websites you may want one per page. This works only if you're prototyping and creating the database at the same time that you are gathering requirements (PSDP recommends this approach).

If you are gathering requirements up front without defining the database nor prototyping, deciding on what artifacts to create takes a bit more effort. Sometimes you can delay creating them or you can group them based on their content. If you're using UML diagrams, you could create one PSDP Artifact per Use Case Diagram or per Use Case.

Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100950, KB Topic: PSDP Artifacts
Q&A: Manage Artifact Assignment with a Team
Question: I've assigned the PSDP Artifact to one developer, how do I manage the filling in of design, the building of the artifact, and testing?

Answer:

If one person is assigned to the filling in of the design items, create one or more additional tasks assigned to that person with a description to fill in all artifacts. If, for example, two developers are then going to build (code) the artifacts, assign one or more tasks to each developer with a description to build specific artifacts. For testing, you'll want a minimum of two tasks, one to complete the test scripts and one task to test each build (a test suite and results is associated with a build). The resulting defects have workflow with assignment built into each defect (a defect is really just a specific type of task).
Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100947, KB Topic: PSDP Artifacts
Definition

PSDP Artifact

Definition: In PSDP Online, a PSDP Artifact links together a task, requirement item, design item, and test script all with the same name and associated with the same project category (if used). You can edit a PSDP artifact as a whole or expand any of the four linked items to include more details. A PSDP artifact simplifies some of the complexities of working with linked items. For example, you get workflow with the linked task, and actors and status of the other items at the artifact level. When you change the artifact name or category, all four items are updated. When you link an actor to an artifact, the requirement item, design item, and test script are updated. The same is true when you change the project/app status.
Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100940, KB Topic: PSDP Artifacts
Q&A: UML and PSDP Artifacts
Question: How do PSDP Artifacts relate to UML Diagrams and other traditional software documentation?

Answer:

If you're doing full blown UML based requirements, then you may wish to not use the requirements section of PSDP Online. However, if you're just using UML Use Case Diagrams to document process, then you can use one PSDP Artifact per use case as a guideline.
Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100970, KB Topic: PSDP Artifacts
Tip: Use Artifacts to Manage Client Expectations
Use PSDP Artifacts to track and document what the client wants. Create one artifact per main requirement, expectation, and/or critical success factor. A nagging problem we always face is documenting what the client wants then design, build, and test it while maintaining a link back to the original requirement. PSDP Artifacts aid in your effort to make sure you fulfill each and every requirement. For doucmentation purposes, you can add as many additional requirement and design items as you wish. You can also add additional test scripts as needed.
Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100949, KB Topic: PSDP Artifacts



Topic: PSDP Categories

Definition

PSDP Category

Definition: A PSDP Category is a PSDP Online feature that allows you to group and organize Tasks, Requirement Items, Design Items, Test Scripts, Builds, and Defects. The PM can turn this optional feature on or off for each feature supported. You can use them any way you wish. A typical use is to organize a project by high level requirements that the client can understand. Under this usage, categories become a intermediate requirement between General Requirements and Requirement Items.
Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100953, KB Topic: PSDP Categories
Tip: Use Categories
Categories allow you to organize your project logically. For example, you may wish to organize your application by source code (All, Client, Server, Database, Installation, Help File, Other), by major features, or by some other criteria. These categories allow you to organize requirements, builds, test scripts, defects, etc.
Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100955, KB Topic: PSDP Categories



Topic: PSDP Change Orders

Q&A: Change Orders
Question: When should I execute a change order on a time and material project?

Answer:

At a minimum, execute a change order whenever the project budget will increase and when it will decrease by a substantial amount. Although not required, you should execute a change order whenever features migrate or are swapped out for other features. You should execute a change order even when the swap has no apparent impact on budget. I say "apparent" because analysts frequently do less research on changes especially when they look like they will have no impact on the budget.
Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100701, KB Topic: PSDP Change Orders
Q&A: PSDP Online: Change Orders
Question: With a PSDP online project, when should I activate the change orders module and when should I create a change order?

Answer:

At Prestwood Software, all billable projects over 40 hours must make use of the change order module. Your first entry in the change order module is your first estimate/budget (a change from 0 to an initial minimum budget). After that, add a change order whenever the project budget increases (mandatory), decreases substantially (optional), or features are changed or swapped out (optional).
Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100702, KB Topic: PSDP Change Orders



Topic: PSDP Checkpoints

Definition

PSDP Checkpoints

Definition:

A checkpoint is NOT a task, but rather a milestone. A point in the project that marks significant progress. Although PSDP contains many standard checkpoints, the executive sponsor and project manager must agree on the checkpoints they wish to track. Once established, tasks can be associated with a checkpoint and you can easily view what tasks are completed per checkpoint and what checkpoints do NOT have tasks established yet.

Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100954, KB Topic: PSDP Checkpoints



Topic: PSDP Design

Definition

PSDP Design Item

Definition:

A software artifact that documents how the software will accomplish what is documented in the requirements. In PSDP, we collect general design and specific detail items. Together the general design and design items make up the Design Specification.

Also, design items are one of the four items that make up a PSDP Artifact.

Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100938, KB Topic: PSDP Design



Topic: PSDP Phases

Q&A: PSDP Phases vs. PSDP Artifacts
Question: How do PSDP Phases relate to PSDP Artifacts and the usage of each?

Answer:

They don't really. In PSDP Online, you set the PSDP Phase of tasks and their two sub-types defects and artifacts only. Requirement Items, Design Items, and Test Scripts do not use the concept of PSDP Phases because they are documentation-only items. You add various development tasks set to the appropriate phase to create, flesh out, and use them to build and test but they do not contain workflow themselves.

The PSDP Phase of Defects is always Phase 6 Testing & Rework. Although Tasks and PSDP Artifacts can be set to any PSDP Phase, their default is Phase 2 Requirements. For PSDP Artifacts, most of the time you will leave it set to it's default. On the other hand, you will set tasks to whatever phase the task belongs to.

Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100952, KB Topic: PSDP Phases
Q&A: Task, Artifact, and Defect Default Phases
Question: What is the default phase for a task, artifact, and defect?

Answer:

The default phase for a defect is Phase 6 Testing & Rework. The default phase for a task or PSDP Artifact is Phase 2 Requirements. Whether or not you have enabled PSDP Phases for a project, the defaults are always set just in case you enable PSDP Phases.

Even though PSDP Artifacts contain a Task, Requirement Item, Design Item, and a Test Script, it belongs to the requirements phase because the Requirement Item is the first real software documentation item. An additional task or tasks of filling in design items belong to Phase 4 Detail Design. The task of coding the artifacts belong to Phase 5 Initial Coding, and finally the task of completing of the test scripts and testing a particular build belongs to Phase 5 Testing & Rework.

Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100948, KB Topic: PSDP Phases



Topic: PSDP Project Management

Q&A: Project Management: Review Budget
Question: In PSDP, when is it appropriate to review the project budget and project tasks?

Answer:

The short answer is at the end of each phase. For larger projects, you may wisth to review more frequently. For all size projects this should not interfere with the normal communication.

If you're using PSDP Online, review the tasks online at the end of each phase. It's a convenient way to view both the big picture total hours as well as drilling down into each task. You can view by phase, category, checkpoint, start date, or due date. If the scope of the project is too large, move items to the wishlist.

With the Rolling Estimates approach, the minimum project budget is adjusted at the end of Requirements, and Detail Design phases. The true scope of the project is known at the end of the detail design phase.

Posted By Mike Prestwood, Post #100967, KB Topic: PSDP Project Management

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