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   ► KBIT Water-Coo...Computer Ind...   Print This    All Groups  
  From the April 2011 Issue of Prestwood eMag
 
Computer Industry:
Great Label Printers
 
Posted 13 years ago on 9/19/2007 and updated 8/20/2011
Take Away:

Nice looking mailing and shipping labels make a statement about you - and/or your business. But printing to sheets of laser or inkjet labels can be a real pain when all you want are one or two labels at a time. This brief article talks about one line of label printers that's particularly convenient, inexpensive, plays nice on a network, and is super-easy to program.

KB100689

Note: This article has updated information as of 08/20/2011.

For several years, now, I've been a fan of the Dymo LabelWriter printers. I've owned a model 300 for several years, and it just works, and works, and works.

My 300 is now replaced by the 400 series. These are 300 dpi thermal printers. The advantages of thermal printers are that they're quiet, don't require refills of toner or ink, and have few moving parts. The only downsides are that you have to use thermal sensitive label stock and, over time, thermal imaging may fade.

In my experience, though, I haven't noticed any fading on labels that are now five years old. Dymo label stock is also reasonably priced - and widely available at office supply stores.

Twin Turbo

Dymo also offers a Twin Turbo - that can be loaded with two different label sizes. This is the model we use here in the office at Prestwood I.T.

Where to Get it!

Here's the link to the manufacturer's web site.

Using and Programming it!

These printers come bundled with a Windows printer driver, and Dymo's own label-making software. The software also adds a new tool-button in Microsoft Word, which makes it super-easy to produce labels at the same time you're creating a document.

Postnet barcoding is available, both in the Dymo software, and via Word.

Because a standard Windows printer driver is included, it's very easy to support these printers in the applications you create. Simply use your regular reporting tool, specify the paper size of the label, then design your label report(s). (In some reporting tools, the printer and paper sizes will be automatically selectable.)

Share-it!

When sharing these printers on a network, Windows XP may not successfully bring over the driver. The solution is simple. Before adding a remote LabelWriter to your list of printers, first use the included CD to install the software and drivers on each target machine.

Update (8/20/2011)

Dymo has made several additions and improvements to their line of label printers. I'll mention just a few...

LabelWriter integration with popular software titles, like Microsoft Outlook, has been greatly improved.  As an example, if you're in Outlook's Contacts area, and open a contact record, you'll see a new button, "Quick Print" with an image of a Dymo LabelWriter. Click that button, and the LabelWriter will instantly print an address label for that contact.

Printing speed is bumped to as high as 71 labels per minute.

The bundled software supports instant printing of postage "stamps," and now includes an "address fixer" that does magical things like correcting erroneous zip codes.

A new model, the 450 Duo, handles both the standard paper stick-on labels (in the same array of sizes), plus plastic stick-on file folder labels. I find this feature so useful that I just ordered one.

Shop the Internet for prices. MSRP for the 450 DUO is $209 as of this writing, but I found one reputable web vendor selling it for $119.

Have experience with this printer? Post it below.


Comments

1 Comments.
Share a thought or comment...
First Comment
Comment 1 of 4

We have recommended and installed Dymo LabelWriters (330, 400, 450 - all Turbo) in client animal hospitals, which use our Animal Hospital Management System (Paradox db) for years with great success.   Ideally in a network environment, we use HP JetDirect 175x print servers, and the combo is a perfect solution for ALL label printing.

Posted 10 years ago

Comment 2 of 4

I have a 400, and use it mostly in a cut and paste fashion, which is not too difficult. I notice there is a Delphi sample app, but I haven't dived in yet. Any experience with using it with Delphi, or is it just  (as you say) like printing to a Windows printer?

(I'm thinking of single labels, not a batch run.)

Posted 10 years ago

Comment 3 of 4

Grey Guru:

Yes, I've programmed for the Dymo LabelWriters in Delphi; actually pretty much exclusively in Delphi.

I haven't looked at the sample Delphi app. Perhaps it was released with a model newer than mine.

To answer the other part of your question: Yes. It's just like coding for any other Windows printer. That's one of the beauties of the Dymo solution.  I've used Fast Reports to "drive my Dymos," and it all works just great.

Posted 10 years ago

Latest Comment
Comment 4 of 4

I've never looked at label printers as a separate item -- we've used the Avery mini-labels for years, and once you have the paper size set up, it's really simple to feed through for 1-4 mailing labels with whatever formatting you want. However, Office Depot recently stopped carrying them, so maybe we'll get forced into special label printers if Avery discontinues the product (!).

Posted 10 years ago
 
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KB Post Contributed By Wes Peterson:

Wes Peterson is a Senior Programmer Analyst with Prestwood IT Solutions where he develops custom Windows software and custom websites using .Net and Delphi. When Wes is not coding for clients, he participates in this online community. Prior to his 10-year love-affair with Delphi, he worked with several other tools and databases. Currently he specializes in VS.Net using C# and VB.Net. To Wes, the .NET revolution is as exciting as the birth of Delphi.

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