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   ► MB LobbyPascal and Delphi Coding BoardDelphi News / Other Topic   Print This     

CodeGear has a new home!

CodeGear has a new home! in Delphi News / Other topic (part of our Pascal and Delphi Coding group).

Quick Search: CodeGear   CodeGear has   CodeGear has new  
Rick Carter
Cincinnati OH USA

For those who haven't been keeping up, some time back Borland "spun off" a separate company named "CodeGear" for its developer tools, also announcing at the time that CodeGear was up for sale.

Well, now there's a buyer! CodeGear is being acquired by Embarcadero Technologies, a database tools company. Key people from both companies are excited about this development. While there are no overlapping products, there is a lot of potential for sharing technology between products, and for "bundling" products.

CodeGear's David I. talks about it:
http://dn.codegear.com/article/38132

Embarcadero's Director of Products talks about it:
http://metafrequency.blogspot.com/2008/05/embarcadero-and-codegear.html
http://metafrequency.blogspot.com/2008/05/twins-separated-at-birth.html

Plans are for CodeGear to continue to release new versions of all their products, including Delphi, C++Builder, JBuilder, Interbase, etc.

Enbarcadero's existing product line will be re-branded as the "DatabaseGear" line (www.databasegear.com has already been purchased and reserved).

Work continues on the next version of Delphi, but it has been pushed back to the last half of this year.
http://dn.codegear.com/article/36620
The Delphi product manager has assured us that there are also plans to continue to develop the Delphi for .NET product, but those plans will soon be released in a separate document.

Rick Carter
Chair, Delphi/Paradox SIG
Cincinnati PC Users Group
 Posted 11 years ago (Thread Starter)
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Post ID #12733, 16 replies
Thread Started 5/11/2008 10:56:37 PM
View Counter=10625
Last Reply Posted 6/3/2008 1:36:56 PM)
Location=Cincinnati OH USA  
Joined=18 years ago   MB Posts=518  
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Mike Prestwood
Prestwood IT
Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA

Thanks for posting that. Wes posted it too to our Industry Group so I linked that news post to this discussion...

http://www.prestwoodboards.com/ASPSuite/KB/document_view.asp?qid=101034

This will be interesting to watch. I still miss the old Phillipe Kahn days. It was fun working at Boralnd during those times. As long as David I is involved, I'm sure it'll be a smooth transition.

--
Mike Prestwood
Prestwood IT Solutions

 Posted 11 years ago
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Post ID #12746 (Level 1.1)  Reply to 12733
Thread Started 5/12/2008 7:42:54 PM
Location=Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA 
Joined=19 years ago   MB Posts=1410   KB Posts=1805   KB Comments=75   BLOG, Topics=4  
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Mike Prestwood
Prestwood IT
Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA

I started in ObjectVision tech support I think in 91 or 92. I was in the middle of writing an ObjectVision 3 book when Borland hired some consultants who told them to [d_rop] ObjectVision. Although ObjectVision 3 was days away from beta 1, it never saw the light of day.

I was then transferred to Paradox for Windows tech support and worked on the beta of Paradox for Windows version 1.0. I stayed on the Paradox team for versions 1, 4.5, and 5. I then worked on Delphi 1.0 as part of the SQL Links team helping developers connect and code to Interbase, MS SQL, Oracle, etc. I left in 1995 to move up here to Sacramento.

--
Mike Prestwood
Prestwood IT Solutions

 Posted 11 years ago
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Post ID #12751 (Level 1.2)  Reply to 12733
Reply Posted 5/13/2008 1:55:52 PM
Location=Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA 
Joined=19 years ago   MB Posts=1410   KB Posts=1805   KB Comments=75   BLOG, Topics=4  
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Mike Prestwood
Prestwood IT
Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Carter

.......

In a comment in another blog, Allen Bauer talks about this as a "dream" that's now coming true:
http://blog.businessofsoftware.org/2008/05/embarcadero-buy.html



That's a great blog. Started out a bit negative but it's interesting and comforting that Greg Keller VP of Product Management at Embarcadaro jumped in. I hope he doesn't get too discouraged with the negative talk. There are ALOT of Delphi fans out here and I think all will feel better in a year or two once we know for sure the products found a home. It's true that Win-32 development is on it's way out so the evolution of the CodeGear products will be interesting to watch. I know someone thought Delphi for PHP was a dumb marketing move, but I thought it was great. I assume he didn't like the name cuz it implies some sort of compatibility but any developer that has any real experience would know that couldn't be true. Anyway, it'll be fun to what happens!

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Mike Prestwood
Prestwood IT Solutions

 Posted 11 years ago
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Post ID #12752 (Level 1.3)  Reply to 12733
Reply Posted 5/13/2008 1:56:37 PM
Location=Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA 
Joined=19 years ago   MB Posts=1410   KB Posts=1805   KB Comments=75   BLOG, Topics=4  
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Mike Prestwood
Prestwood IT
Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA

Hi Rick,

>>>With regard to my, "It's true that Win-32 development is on it's way out so the evolution of the CodeGear products will be interesting to watch."

>>>>Is that a fact?

Great new direction for this thread. I love this topic. I was a bit short so I'll comment on your points and add more complete information behind that statement. I, by no means am an expert on this subject. I'm just following it much in the same way you are because my shop has enthusiasts for both Delphi and VS.Net (and others). We build both new Win32 and .Net apps right now. Up until about a year ago, I held pretty much your exact same view. I guess the more I work with VS.Net and the .Net framework, I'm gradually accepting it more and more.

My brother Brian Prestwood, CTO of Prestwood Software, is an all-in .Net developer so we have very spirited discussions about this specific topic.

At this time, .Net does not replace the Win32 API, it only augments it. So the bottom line is that I believe your comments are very fair. One of my concerns is when and if Microsoft will rewrite the core file system, devices, process, threads, error handling, etc. in DotNet and "skip over" the Win32 API when booting up. Perhaps my concern is premature, but currently I think it's coming.

Although Microsoft hasn't released a clear road map on this subject (at least not that I've seen), it seems like the logical next evolutionary step.

  • Windows 3.1 booted up DOS and BIOS then you loaded Windows. Initial Windows apps were slower than DOS apps.
  • Windows NT, W2K, XP, etc. don't start up with DOS anymore and they avoid the BIOS and DOS.
  • Although Windows 95 starts up in DOS, it essentially goes around DOS and the BIOS.
  • Windows Vista, 2003, and 2008 REQUIRE the .Net framework and will not run without it.

Will .Net follow this pattern? Will it 100% replace the Win32 API? I don't know but I think it will. Right now the .Net Framework uses the Win32 API. Perhaps in the future Win32 will be emulated in a pure .NET Operating system. That's what I meant by my comment and it indeed will be interesting to follow.

The Win32 API is getting a bit old. It's now approaching 15 years old (okay maybe 12 years old) and with each version of Windows changes and evolves. The Win32 API was based on the Win16 API which is even older. In those days, C was king so the Win32 API is built with C programmers in mind. The Win32 API is missing some of the features available in new technologies (name spaces for example simplify the naming schemes in .Net). The .Net architecture got to start over and has some pretty neat technologies in it.

>>Native code, properly optimized, will run faster, and have less deployment issues.

I believe in general that can be true and for existing Win32 apps I think it makes alot of sense and with the upcoming 64-bit version of Delphi, that gives Delphi apps some breathing room. I think we agree on existing apps. I think we do. My company frequently chooses to build a Delphi Win32 app over a .Net app.

Win32 API versus .Net Framework (sometimes called the WinFX API)

My concerns are primarily with new apps and deciding between a Delphi Win32 app versus a VS.Net app. Here are some things I think about with regard to that subject:

  1. Windows Vista, Server 2003 and 2008 do not run without the .Net framework. It's an integral part of the operating system so future Windows operating systems will run .Net applications as easily as they run Win32 API apps.
  2. The Win32 API will be around a long time so building new apps is still viable today....hmmm...okay, that's one for Delphi!

Existing Apps - The bottom line for me is that I like all these tools and we have enthusiasts in both camps. For existing applications, you can make a good argument to leave it in it's current development tool and keep enhancing it. Right now my company still maintains Paradox, Access, ASP, and Visual FoxPro applications. When to convert to Delphi, VS.Net, Java, or something else is a combo business/technology decision. I speak with my clients and try to guide them on this subject.

New Apps - For me, it's about target Platform. If the new app is a commercial application or the target platform is Win32, I stir my clients toward Delphi. If it's a general business database application or the target is .Net, we stir them toward VS.Net. If the target platform is the Browser, I stir them toward ASP or ASP.Net. For cross-platform, we usually recommend Java. However, no tool is off the table. We still occasionally build a new Paradox app if the situation is right!

Delphi's Future

I love Delphi and firmly believe it will succeed. The only question is will it ever be King again. The biggest problem I see is that prior to VS.Net, Delphi was king. It was easily superior to VB and other tools, at least one could easily make an argument that it was superior. Starting with VS.Net 2005 you can build true Win32 API apps using C++ so VS.Net developers can make a good argument that it's better than Delphi at creating Win32 apps but it doesn't really matter so long as one can make a good argument (meaning they're that close). It's like the debate between Access and Paradox, I hear from developers all the time that claim one or the other is superior. They're so close in functionality that it doesn't even matter.

For building .Net apps, it's a difficult argument to say that Delphi.Net is better than VS.Net. I've tried, it's a very hard sell currently. My opinion is that's one of the main reasons why Delphi sales have slowed and continue to slow. My opinion continues to be that Delphi is the best Win32 development environment. I can easily make that case. Predicting the future is hard, but if Delphi.Net can become better than VS.Net at building .Net apps, then Delphi.Net sales will soar. Furthermore, it doesn't "really" have to be better, you just have to be able to make a good argument that it is. There is enough anti-MS sentiment out there that if I could make a reasonable case, I could land more Delphi.Net projects. Right now, VS.Net has pretty much a monopoly on building .Net apps.

--
Mike Prestwood
Prestwood IT Solutions

 Posted 11 years ago
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Post ID #12754 (Level 1.4)  Reply to 12733
Reply Posted 5/14/2008 8:20:28 PM
Last Updated 5/27/2008 10:28:43 AM
Location=Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA 
Joined=19 years ago   MB Posts=1410   KB Posts=1805   KB Comments=75   BLOG, Topics=4  
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Mike Prestwood
Prestwood IT
Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA
Quote:
Originally Posted by KBerry

I don't think being a commercial app necessarily rules out .NET over Win32 platform.......

Hi Kim:

You and I have had some really good one-on-one discussions about this subject and I think in general we agree and this is more about exploring the details. 

My belief is that neither Win32 API apps nor .Net apps are currently king of commercial apps. There are plenty of apps being built using both. You must choose the best tool for the situation. My comment was more about maximum compatibility and ease of installation. It's not that big a deal to force a particular version of the .Net framework onto your customers, my opinion is that it's just a bit cleaner to roll with a true Win32 API app for some situations. So, I 100% agree with your first statement above. As for the second statement, I think that's a VS.Net viewpoint. I accept it, but don't 100% agree with it. The rest of this post explores this.

Part of what we do as professional programers is to help our clients decide what tools and platforms to build for. If you speak to a programmer who ONLY codes in VS.Net, then they will have a very myopic view of the world. Everything should be .Net type of mentality. The problem with that is every six months or so there's a new technology and that same programmer is likely to switch and start recommending everything in that. Just cuz it's new doesn't mean is right for all situations. When Java first rolled out, everyone wanted to do Java. Currently AJAX is all the rage. Both are great solutions but it's still a decision process to decide whcih set of tools to use for a particular project. 

Some questions to consider:

  • What are most new Windows commercial applications built with? Are they Win32 API apps or .Net apps? My impression is that most new apps are still built as Win32 API apps.
  • What is the trend? Will most commercial applications be built using .Net? If so, how soon?
  • Does Microsoft internally build ONLY .Net apps? No. Not even close. My understanding is that even today most of their commercial apps are Win32 API apps. MS Paint, Notepad, Money, Office, etc. are all Win32 API apps. You have to ask yourself why this is.
  • What does the future hold? If I'm right that the Win32 API is old and on it's way out, then it's probably not a bad idea to build ONLY .Net apps for new apps. However, because the Win32 API isn't going anywhere soon, keeping existing Win32 API apps in Win32 is a decent decision (and probably the correct decision).

There are some really neat technologies in .Net but this isn't like it was to go from DOS to Windows. You had to do that to get "the new" GUI look. Going from DOS to Windows was less about "if" and more about "when". I don't even think this is like going from Win16 to Win32 because .Net apps are still compiled down to a true Win32 executable. I think this is more about what's best for the project your working on. I haven't seen a clear roadmap from MS that says the Win32 API is going to be history. When that occurs, then it will be less about "if" and more about "when".

--
Mike Prestwood
Prestwood IT Solutions

 Posted 11 years ago
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Post ID #12756 (Level 1.5)  Reply to 12733
Reply Posted 5/15/2008 8:54:43 AM
Location=Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA 
Joined=19 years ago   MB Posts=1410   KB Posts=1805   KB Comments=75   BLOG, Topics=4  
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Mike Prestwood
Prestwood IT
Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wes

......Maybe one day we'll see a product, ”CLR2Machine," that’ll take the tokenized.NET output, and compile it down to a disk image that's true machine code........


We have that now with .Net, it's called NGen.exe (Native Image Generator). It does what the JIT compiler does but ahead of time. It exists for the exact reasons you stated, performance. It generates processor specific machine code from MSIL (X86, X64, etc).

Here is a link that gives more specifics about NGen.exe:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6t9t5wcf.aspx

I think Kim was talking about GUIs for general business database applications and "regular" (if you allow me to say that) commercial applications. I can tell by your reply you agree, but I just wanted to make sure and echo that.

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Mike Prestwood
Prestwood IT Solutions

 Posted 11 years ago
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About Mike Prestwood

Mike Prestwood is a drummer, an author, and creator of the PrestwoodBoards online community. He is the President & CEO of Prestwood IT Solutions. Prestwood IT provides Coding, Website, and Computer Tech services. Mike has authored 6 computer books and over 1,200 articles. As a drummer, he maintains play-drums.com and has authored 3 drum books. If you have a project you wish to discuss with Mike, you can send him a private message through his PrestwoodBoards home page or call him 9AM to 4PM PST at 916-726-5675 x205.

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Post ID #12758 (Level 1.6)  Reply to 12733
Reply Posted 5/15/2008 3:34:58 PM
Location=Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA 
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Mike Prestwood
Prestwood IT
Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA

Here's a link to the Delphi and C++Builder Roadmap is a summary of the next year or so of the intended development plans.

I didn't see anything about Delphi for .Net on the roadmap. I thought I read recenlty about some future plans with Delphi for .Net. Anyone heard what's going on with that?

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Mike Prestwood
Prestwood IT Solutions

 Posted 11 years ago
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Post ID #12770 (Level 1.7)  Reply to 12733
Reply Posted 5/24/2008 5:19:56 PM
Location=Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA 
Joined=19 years ago   MB Posts=1410   KB Posts=1805   KB Comments=75   BLOG, Topics=4  
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Mike Prestwood
Prestwood IT
Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA

Another point to consider in favor of Delphi...

Delphi has always strived to make things easier for developers and to adopt new technologies early. For example, Delphi for Win32 has consistently supported Vista and Aero features before VS.Net does.

Here aer two references...

Writing native Win32 applications for the Windows Vista Aero UI
by Steve Trefethen
http://www.stevetrefethen.com/blog/WritingNativeWin32ApplicationsForTheWindowsVistaAeroUI.aspx

Codegear Ahead of Microsoft on Vista Support
by Marco Cantu
 http://blog.marcocantu.com/blog/codegear_ahead_microsoft.html

--
Mike Prestwood
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 Posted 11 years ago
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Post ID #12787 (Level 1.8)  Reply to 12733
Reply Posted 5/28/2008 10:14:42 PM
Location=Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA 
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Rick Carter
Cincinnati OH USA

Thanks for the reply, Mike. I wasn't aware you were a Borland employee, but I guess it shouldn't surprise me. What years were you there? Did you work mainly on Paradox?

In a comment in another blog, Allen Bauer talks about this as a "dream" that's now coming true:
http://blog.businessofsoftware.org/2008/05/embarcadero-buy.html

Rick Carter
Chair, Delphi/Paradox SIG
Cincinnati PC Users Group
 Posted 11 years ago (Thread Starter)
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Post ID #12749 (Level 1.9)  Reply to 12733
Reply Posted 5/13/2008 9:28:17 AM
Location=Cincinnati OH USA  
Joined=18 years ago   MB Posts=518  
Rick Carter
Cincinnati OH USA

"It's true that Win-32 development is on it's way out..."

Is that a fact?  More likely a widely-held opinion. Many Delphi programmers think the future for their own applications is in native code, not .NET. Native code, properly optimized, will run faster, and have less deployment issues.

Of course, native Win64 will be more in demand in the future, which is why next year's Delphi release will feature a native Win64 compiler. 

Rick Carter
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Cincinnati PC Users Group
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Post ID #12753 (Level 1.10)  Reply to 12733
Reply Posted 5/14/2008 11:53:01 AM
Location=Cincinnati OH USA  
Joined=18 years ago   MB Posts=518  
Rick Carter
Cincinnati OH USA
Quote:
Originally Posted by mprestwood

Here's a link to the Delphi and C++Builder Roadmap is a summary of the next year or so of the intended development plans.

I didn't see anything about Delphi for .Net on the roadmap. I thought I read recenlty about some future plans with Delphi for .Net. Anyone heard what's going on with that?

Nick Hodges, the Delphi Product manager, has said there is a separate roadmap document in the works that will cover plans for Delphi for .NET, and it should be released sometime soon.

By the way, I agree with a lot of what Mike and Wes have said about how there are still times and places where Win32 development is appropriate. But you guys said it so well that I have nothing to add.

Also, Wes said something about how he hasn't seen a good new Delphi book lately. Both Marco Cantu and Bob Swart have released books on Delphi 2007, but they're not available through the bookstores or on Amazon; you'll find them at lulu.com.

There's also a new Delphi/Pascal magazine, Blaise Pascal, coming out quarterly. You can get a paid subcription, which gives you a printed magazine, and allows you to download all source code. Or, you can register to dowload each issue for free as a PDF file, and pay individually for source code to articles you're interested in.

Rick Carter
Chair, Delphi/Paradox SIG
Cincinnati PC Users Group
 Posted 11 years ago (Thread Starter)
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Post ID #12785 (Level 1.11)  Reply to 12733
Reply Posted 5/26/2008 11:24:57 PM
Location=Cincinnati OH USA  
Joined=18 years ago   MB Posts=518  
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Rick Carter
Cincinnati OH USA

Another news article on the acquisition of CodeGear by Embarcadero:

http://www.sdtimes.com/content/article.aspx?ArticleID=32238

Sounds like they're very optimistic!

Rick Carter
Chair, Delphi/Paradox SIG
Cincinnati PC Users Group
 Posted 11 years ago (Thread Starter)
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Post ID #12806 (Level 1.12)  Reply to 12733
Reply Posted 6/3/2008 1:36:56 PM
Location=Cincinnati OH USA  
Joined=18 years ago   MB Posts=518  
Kim Berry
Prestwood IT
Citrus Heights, CA USA

I don't think being a commercial app necessarily rules out .NET over Win32 platform. It's reasonable now to require XP or better. Most will already have .NET installed, and if not, then the installer could install it.

the .NET app would have a smaller footprint. Unlike Java apps, the UI speed of .NET app is indistinguishable from a Win32 app. It would probably take less hours to develop, and since the goal of a commercial app is to make a profit, that needs to be considered too.

Win32 apps must be installed and uninstalled. .NET click-once remove this burden, allowing just the server image to be updated, and all the clients get a fresh "install" the next time they run.

--
Kim Berry
Senior Programmer Analyst

 Posted 11 years ago
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About Kim Berry

Kim Berry is an experienced coder currently specializing in VS.Net C# coding of WinForm and WebForm applications. Kim currently works part time for Prestwood IT Solutions and participates in this online community when time allows. Kim worked fulltime at Prestwood Software for four years and is still available for part time evenings and weekends work. He was one of the main Prestwood developers developing ASPSuite and has coded in many languages including C, Visual Basic, Delphi, and Visual Studio.Net.


Post ID #12755 (Level 1.13)  Reply to 12733
Reply Posted 5/14/2008 10:09:47 PM
Location=Citrus Heights, CA USA 
Joined=17 years ago   MB Posts=65   KB Posts=19   BLOG, Topics=4  
Wes Peterson
Prestwood IT
Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA

There's an old Chinese curse: "May you live in interesting times." Boy, do we ever!

What an interesting thread; some great opinions. So I'll throw in my two cents...

Back in the day, there was a famous saying in IT: "Nobody ever got fired for buying IBM." Today, one might say it's become "Nobody ever got fired for buying Microsoft." Now, even though I'm an avid Delphi fan (been using it since the pre-release of version 1), I'm fascinated and excited about .NET. And most of the rest of the world seems to agree.

That said, I still love Delphi.

The first thing I'd like to clarify, though, is the nature of .NET "executables." When we get "down to the metal," there is only one thing our microprocessors understand - native machine code. How we get our code to that state can vary wildly.

At one end of the spectrum, we have full interpreters. Think of the commands you type into the "DOS box," or the JavaScript that executes within a browser. In both cases, human-readable code must be interpreted, at run time, into native machine code. The most powerful Pentium still cannot handle "printf("Hello World.");"

At the far other end, we have assemblers and "complete" compilers/linkers. Delphi apps that target Win32 produce native Intel machine code - as does the C++ compiler in Visual Studio (when used to target Win32). You don't need to be a rocket scientist to predict which will perform better: a fully interpreted program, or an Intel native code program.

And, for virtually the entire life of the personal computer, we've had tools that produce something in between. I remember old Pascal "compilers" for CP/M that emitted "P-code," which, in turn depended upon some intermediate runtime element to finish the job of taking the P-code (partially compiled - or tokenized code) to the final level - instructions the microprocessor can handle. These intermediaries didn't have to do as much work as a full interpreter, but they certainly had to do some.

We've been through this before. Remember the debacle when Corel re-wrote their office suite in Java? It was a disaster, not because there's anything wrong with Java, or with the Java Virtual Machine, but because the hardware of that day simply couldn't run the JVM fast enough.

Now we have the "JITTER" That's the .NET just-in-time compiler that takes a .NET "exe" down to the metal. It's roughly analogous to the JVM. Unfortunately, the resulting fast code is ephemeral; it doesn't remain permanently installed on your machine. If you have lots of cache space, it may stay cached for quite some time. But when you reboot, it’s gone, and it has to be “jittered” all over again.

In one of my Microsoft Press books about .NET (sorry, I don't have it handy to cite author and page number), the author states that Visual Studio includes a C++ compiler/linker that emits native Intel machine code for one, simple reason: Performance. His words, not mine.

This is one reason why I'll take gentle exception to Kim's assertion "the UI speed of .NET app is indistinguishable from a Win32 app." That may be true if you put enough "horsepower" in the machine - the difference probably would be indistinguishable to a human user. On my aging laptop, however, I can certainly see and feel the difference when using the .NET client for SoureGear Vault, and I'm allowing for the latency in the necessarily large data transfers. Operations that are entirely local are visibly sluggish when compared to similar operations in a native Win32 executable.

Which, in no way, negates the value, or importance of .NET. If my laptop were a current model with a fast, multi-core processor, gobs of RAM, and a high-end SATA hard drive, that sluggish .NET client app would probably seem blazingly fast. Which brings me to an important observation:

At the UI level, if it responds as fast, or faster, than the human user can complete the next task, it's arguably fast enough. So, as the deployed base of machines becomes sufficiently powerful, .NET can be great.

One of the things that excites me most about .NET is that its languages, like C#, are more "complete" than, say, Object Pascal. Another is that Microsoft is paying a lot of attention to "packaging" useful design patterns, and providing powerful frameworks that can drastically reduce development time.

Another major advantage of .NET is the wealth of books, tutorials, web resources, components, and code libraries. The days of having a plethora of timely books on Delphi are long past. When was the last time you saw a great, new Delhi book? I'm still waiting.

Performance again? We've been talking about perceived performance, what the human user measures. My hunch is that there will always be a small class of applications that demand true performance - as opposed to perceived performance. In that venue, highly optimized, native machine code will always win - all other factors being equal.

Maybe one day we'll see a product, ”CLR2Machine," that’ll take the tokenized.NET output, and compile it down to a disk image that's true machine code.

Until then, if more than perceived performance is required, tools like Delphi will continue to have an important role.

I think Delphi remains a highly viable solution for Win32 desktop applications, DLLs, and web services. The same will be true when Delphi's compiler supports Win64. But, if you need to develop a visual web solution in .NET, Delphi is still playing catch-up, and Visual Studio is the way to go.

The great things are we have more tool choices than ever - and we definitely live in interesting times.

Wes Peterson
Senior Software Engineer
Prestwood IT Solutions
http://www.prestwood.com

 Posted 11 years ago
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About Wes Peterson

Wes Peterson is a Senior Programmer Analyst with Prestwood IT Solutions where he develops custom Windows software and custom websites using .Net and Delphi. When Wes is not coding for clients, he participates in this online community. Prior to his 10-year love-affair with Delphi, he worked with several other tools and databases. Currently he specializes in VS.Net using C# and VB.Net. To Wes, the .NET revolution is as exciting as the birth of Delphi.


Post ID #12757 (Level 1.14)  Reply to 12733
Reply Posted 5/15/2008 12:56:08 PM
Location=Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA 
Joined=15 years ago   MB Posts=158   KB Posts=163   KB Comments=34   BLOG, Topics=20  
Wes Peterson
Prestwood IT
Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA

>We have that now with .Net, it's called NGen.exe (Native Image Generator).

Wow. I learn something new every day.  And thanks for the link.  I've begun reading it, and it certainly looks like an important step in the quest for performance.

I'm not sure, yet, just where it fits in the Develop - Deploy - End User scheme of things.  It appears to be something that an Admin end user can use to get a Windows PE (Portable Executable) file from MSIL.

I wasn't terribly concerned about UI performance in typical, line-of-business, desktop applictions, just a little concerned.   I really do believe that, given a sufficiently powerful machine, .NET desktop apps will run just fine.

But I'm not ready to uninstall Delphi! 

Wes Peterson
Senior Software Engineer
Prestwood IT Solutions
http://www.prestwood.com

 Posted 11 years ago
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About Wes Peterson

Wes Peterson is a Senior Programmer Analyst with Prestwood IT Solutions where he develops custom Windows software and custom websites using .Net and Delphi. When Wes is not coding for clients, he participates in this online community. Prior to his 10-year love-affair with Delphi, he worked with several other tools and databases. Currently he specializes in VS.Net using C# and VB.Net. To Wes, the .NET revolution is as exciting as the birth of Delphi.


Post ID #12759 (Level 1.15)  Reply to 12733
Reply Posted 5/15/2008 5:26:09 PM
Last Updated 5/27/2008 10:27:52 AM
Location=Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA 
Joined=15 years ago   MB Posts=158   KB Posts=163   KB Comments=34   BLOG, Topics=20  
Wes Peterson
Prestwood IT
Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA

Rick,

This is one of those times I'm pleased to be corrected.  Thanks for passing on the great news about the new Delphi publications. I'll be checking them out ASAP.

Wes Peterson
Senior Software Engineer
Prestwood IT Solutions
http://www.prestwood.com

 Posted 11 years ago
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About Wes Peterson

Wes Peterson is a Senior Programmer Analyst with Prestwood IT Solutions where he develops custom Windows software and custom websites using .Net and Delphi. When Wes is not coding for clients, he participates in this online community. Prior to his 10-year love-affair with Delphi, he worked with several other tools and databases. Currently he specializes in VS.Net using C# and VB.Net. To Wes, the .NET revolution is as exciting as the birth of Delphi.


Post ID #12786 (Level 1.16)  Reply to 12733
Reply Posted 5/27/2008 4:21:11 PM
Location=Prestwood IT office in Citrus Heights, CA 
Joined=15 years ago   MB Posts=158   KB Posts=163   KB Comments=34   BLOG, Topics=20  

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Wes Peterson
1. Embarcadero Technologies To Acquire CodeGear

Borland no longer owns Delphi, C++Builder, JBuilder, Interbase, etc.

Posted to KB Topic: General News & Trends
11 years ago, and updated 10 years ago

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