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   ► MB LobbyC# (Visual C# & VS.Net) BoardC# & WinForms Topic   Print This     

C#?

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Brian Prestwood
Prestwood IT
Sacramento, CA USA
Assuming C# is intended to compete with Java, I wonder why Microsoft didn't just focus on VB. Now that VB has implementation inheritance it is a viable option for OOP.

Brian Prestwood, MCSD-MCT
Chief Technology Officer
Prestwood Software

 Posted 19 years ago (Thread Starter)
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Post ID #23, 3 replies
Thread Started 11/2/2000 12:19:00 AM
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Last Reply Posted 11/3/2000 1:19:00 PM)
Location=Sacramento, CA USA  
Joined=19 years ago   MB Posts=12   KB Comments=1  
dprothero
 (Inactive)
Stockton, CA, USA
It is true that the next version of VB has been greatly improved to be truly OOP. They've even thrown in try..catch..finally style exception handling, which is nice. However, Microsoft's strategy is to offer a common API, garbage collection, exception handling, and object model by way of the .NET Common Language Runtime. By doing this, they let the programmer choose what language they want to develop in. For this new .NET platform they are offering the following languages: C#, C++, VB, and JScript. They've also confirmed third parties are working on things like COBOL, PERL, and Eiffel. I've even heard Pascal mentioned (whether Borland is involved with that one, I have no idea).

Anyway, C# is a modern language and while it is somewhat similar to Java, Microsoft isn't positioning it as the only competition to Java. The Common Language Runtime is more the competition to Java. On top of that, you simply pick whichever language you want to use. In fact, you can even write a .NET component in C#, inherit from it and add more functionality in VB, and then use it in a JScript ASP page.

So to go back to your original question, yes, VB is now even more a viable alternative than ever. However, Microsoft isn't putting all their eggs into one basket, which is smart.

As an aside, the way .NET is designed is using established standards such as HTTP and SOAP. It is perfectly conceivable to have components running on other platforms such as Linux.


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David Prothero
Owner / Consultant
Prothero Consulting
(209) 956-9180
 Posted 19 years ago
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Post ID #27 (Level 1.1)  Reply to 23
Thread Started 11/2/2000 9:54:00 AM
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Location=Stockton, CA, USA  
Joined=19 years ago   MB Posts=20  
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dprothero
 (Inactive)
Stockton, CA, USA

Originally posted by Brian Prestwood:
My theory is that any MS C++ shops are/were looking closely at Java as an alternative with a smaller learning curve. Microsoft knows VB's poor reputation among C++ programmers will prohibit them from converting the C++ shops to VB shops. C# makes it easy for MS to keep these customers.



Abosultely. C# is what VB can be, but only to have another language without the stigma of VB.


Originally posted by Brian Prestwood:
As for quality control, VB was due for a ground up re-write of the core. The common runtime and .NET framework effectively provides that. Now that the core has been re-writen there is still the issue of language defects. Java's approach of shipping the source code addresses the language defect problem nicely. I saw a demo that made it look like MS was going to provide the source code for the .NET framework. Do you know if they are?



It doesn't sound like it. I know that they have submitted the .NET framework to the internet standards people to see if they can make it a standard. Since it is based on XML and SOAP, any platform should be able to support .NET.


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 Posted 19 years ago
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Post ID #56 (Level 1.2)  Reply to 23
Reply Posted 11/3/2000 1:19:00 PM
Location=Stockton, CA, USA  
Joined=19 years ago   MB Posts=20  
Moderator
Brian Prestwood
Prestwood IT
Sacramento, CA USA
>So to go back to your original question

My theory is that any MS C++ shops are/were looking closely at Java as an alternative with a smaller learning curve. Microsoft knows VB's poor reputation among C++ programmers will prohibit them from converting the C++ shops to VB shops. C# makes it easy for MS to keep these customers.

As for VB, it has turned out to be its own worst enemy. It makes Windows programming so easy that even non-programmers can write Windows programs, or non-programs as the case may be:-).

Aside from poor VB quality control, this has been the largest contributing factor to the poor reputation VB has in some shops. If any other language were as easy to use as VB it would have the same problem. VBA in MS Access is an even more extreme example.

Unfortunatly, a steep toolset learning curve doesn't guarantee a quality end product. It just prevents unprepared "programmers" from trying.

As for quality control, VB was due for a ground up re-write of the core. The common runtime and .NET framework effectively provides that. Now that the core has been re-writen there is still the issue of language defects. Java's approach of shipping the source code addresses the language defect problem nicely. I saw a demo that made it look like MS was going to provide the source code for the .NET framework. Do you know if they are?

Brian Prestwood, MCSD-MCT
Chief Technology Officer
Prestwood Software

 Posted 19 years ago (Thread Starter)
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Post ID #55 (Level 1.3)  Reply to 23
Reply Posted 11/3/2000 1:09:00 PM
Location=Sacramento, CA USA  
Joined=19 years ago   MB Posts=12   KB Comments=1  

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