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   ► KBProgrammingC#Tool Basics   Print This     

C# KB: Tool Basics Topic



11 Articles Found in the Tool Basics Topic 

  KB Article    

Mike Prestwood
1. C# Assignment (=)

Languages Focus: Assignment

Common assignment operators for languages include =, ==, and :=. An assignment operator allows you to assign a value to a variable. The value can be a literal value like "Mike" or 42 or the value stored in another variable or returned by a function.

C# Assignment

C# uses = for it's assignment operator.

12 years ago, and updated 12 years ago
(1 Comments , last by quick.e )

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2. C# Case Sensitivity (Yes)

C# is case sensitive. The following does NOT:

messagebox.Show("hello"); //Does not work!

The first time you type any other case for commands or variables, VS.Net will change it to the accepted or defined case. For example, if you type messagebox.show it is converted to MessageBox.Show. Once corrected, you can break it again by editing MessageBox to messagebox and the compiler will give you an error.

12 years ago, and updated 11 years ago

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3. C# Comparison Operators (==, !=)

General Info: Round Floating Point Numbers

When comparing floating point numbers, make sure you round to an acceptable level of rounding for the type of application you are using.

Languages Focus: Comparison Operators

A comparison operator compares two values either literals as in "Hello" and 3 or variables as in X and Counter. Most languages use the same operators for comparing both numbers and strings. Perl, for example, uses separate sets of comparison operators for numbers and strings.

C# Comparison Operators

Common comparison operators:

== equal
!= not equal
< less than
> greater than
<= less than or equal
>= greater than or equal

12 years ago, and updated 11 years ago

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4. C# Constants (const)

In C#, you define constants with the const keyword.

All constants are part of a class (no global constants) but you can make a constant public and have access to it so long as you have added the class to the project (even without creating the class as if they were static, but you cannot use the static keyword).

Constants must be of an integral type (sbyte, byte, short, ushort, int, uint, long, ulong, char, float, double, decimal, bool, or string), an enumeration, or a reference to null.

11 years ago, and updated 11 years ago

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5. C# Deployment Overview

C# projects require the .Net framework and any additional dependencies you've added such as Crystal Reports.

In Visual Studio.Net, you can create a Setup and Deployment project by using any of the templates available on the New Project dialog (Other Project Types).

In addition, C# projects also support ClickOnce which brings the ease of Web deployment to Windows Forms and console applications. To get started, right click on your solution in the Solution Explorer, click Properties then select the Security tab. 

In addition, you can use any of the many free and commercially available installation packages.

11 years ago

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6. C# File Extensions

Common source code file extensions include:

  • .SLN - Solution File. Contains solution specific information such as links to the projects within this solution.
  • .CSPROJ - C# Project File. Contains project specific information.
  • .CS - C# source file.
  • .Designer.CS - C# form file (a text resource file).
12 years ago, and updated 11 years ago

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7. C# Multiple Line Comment (// or /* */)

Commenting Code
C# uses "//" for a single line comment and /* */ for a multiple line comment.

12 years ago, and updated 11 years ago
(5 Comments , last by jhon.r )

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8. C# Overview and History

Language Overview: C# is an OOP language (no global functions or variables) and is type-safe. You code using a fully OOP approach (everything is in a class).

Target Platforms: C# is most suitable for creating any type of application that runs on the .Net platform. This includes desktop business applications using WinForms and websites using WebForms.

12 years ago, and updated 11 years ago

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9. C# Report Tools Overview

For WebForm applications the client target is the browser (a document interfaced GUI), a common solution is to simply output an HTML formatted page with black text and a white background (not much control but it does work for some situations). For WinForm applications, Crystal Reports is still a popular choice with C# developers because it has been bundled with many Microsoft products, it's overall popularity, and compatibility with many different development tools.

12 years ago, and updated 12 years ago
(1 Comments , last by Anonymous )

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10. C# String Concatenation (+)

C# String Concatenation

C# performs implicit casting of numbers to strings. To concatenate two strings, a string to an integer, or a string to a floating point number, use the + operator. For example, to convert a floating point number to a string just concatenate an empty string to the number as in "" + 3.2.

Alternatively, you can use the System.Text.StringBuilder class which frequently but not always provides faster code.

12 years ago, and updated 11 years ago

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11. C# Variables (Int16 x=0;)

C++, Java, and C# all use C-like variable declaration.

C# has C-like variable declaration and although variables are case sensitive, VS.Net will auto-fix your variable names to the defined case.

C# offers many variable types. Some common types used include short, intlong, float, double, decimal, Int16, UInt16, Int32, Int64, string, and bool.

You can also specify the value when you declare a variable as in:

String FirstName = "Mike";
String LastName = "Prestwood";
Int16 Age = 42;
12 years ago, and updated 11 years ago

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